Thursday, December 13, 2007

IIT JEE Online Material

Slowly my effort to record my relearning effort is bearing fruit, as I am continuing adding material. The material is more in chemistry site. But once I complete posting the basic material in all the chapters of chemistry, I can take up physics also. I am happy that I shall be in a position to provide some free IIT JEE material which at least will serve the purpose of additional reading for many persons.

www.iit-jee-chemistry.blogspot.com
www.iit-jee-chemistry-ps.blogspot.com
www.iit-jee-chemistry-aps.blogspot.com
www.iit-jee-maths.blogspot.com

Monday, December 10, 2007

Physics Text in Word Format

Download physics text in word. Then modify as you want and create a note in easy way.

http://www.anselm.edu/internet/physics/cbphysics/downloadsI.html

http://www.anselm.edu/internet/physics/cbphysics/downloadsII.html

Lots of problems and solutions also are available.

Halliday, Resnick and Walker - Lecture Notes

The web pages having lecture materials of various professors on Resnick and Walker book are given in appropriate chapters of Study guide posts of H C Verma. You can download those pdf files.

Wednesday, October 24, 2007

JEE Physics Matix Match Type Questions

web sites
Measurements
Download
http://plasma4.sr.unh.edu/ng/phys407/phys407-6-13-05.pdf

--------------------------
JEE 2007 Paper I
--------------------------------------------.
Q.I. Some physical quantities are given in column I and some possible SI units in which these
quantities may be expressed are given in column II. Match the physical quantities in column I
with the units in Column II and indicate your answer by darkening appropriate bubbles in the 4 ×
4 matrix given in the ORS.
Column I


==================================================
A.
GM-e M-s ------ ---[ P. (volt) (coulomb) (metre)]

G – universal gravitational constant,
M-e – mass of the earth
M-s – Mass of the Sun
==================================================
B.
3RT/M --------------[Q. (kilogram)(metre^3)(second^-2)]

R – universal gas constant
T – absolute temperature
M – molar mass
==================================================
C.
F^2/(B^2Q^2)------------------------------[R. (metre^2)(second^-2)]

F – force
Q – charge
B – magnetic field
=================================================
D
(GM-e)/R-e ------------[S. (farad)(volt^2)(kg^-1)]

G – universal gravitational constant,
M-e – mass of the earth
R-e – radius of the earth
=================================================


Answer

(A) -- (P), (Q)
(B) -- (R), (S)
(C) -- (R) , S
(D) -- R, S
----------------------------------------------------------------

Q.II. Column I gives certain situations in which a straight metallic wire of resistance R is used and column II gives some resulting effects. Match the statement in column I with the statements in column II and indicate your answer by darkening appropriate bubbles in the 4 × 4 matrix given in the ORS.

================================
Column I -----------------------------Column II
(A to D) -----------------------------(P to S)
==========================================================
(A) A charged capacitor is ---(P) A constant current flows
connected to------------------through the wire
the ends of the wire
===========================================================
(B)The wire is moved ----------(Q) thermal energy
perpendicular to its length -------generated in the wire
length with a constant
velocity in a uniform magnetic field
perpendicular to the plane of motion
===========================================================
(C)
The wire is placed in a -----------(R) A constant potential
constant electric field ---------- difference develops
that has direction-----------------between the ends of
along the length of the wire-------the wire

============================================================
(D) A battery of constant ----------(S) Charges of constant
emf is connected to the --------------- magnitude appear
ends of the wire-----------------------at the ends of the wire
============================================================

Solution
(A) -- (Q)
(B) -- (R), (S),
(C) -- (S)
(D) -- (P), (Q) , (R)
-----------------------------------------------------

Q. III.

Some laws/ processes are given in Column I. Match these with physical phenomena given in Column II and indicate your answer by darkening appropriate bubbles in the 4 × 4 matrix given in the ORS.

---Column I ------------------------Column II

A. Transition between -----------P.Characteristic X-rays
two atomic energy----------------
levles

B. Electron emission-------------Q. Photoelectric effect
from a material------------------

C. Mosley’s law------------------R. Hydrogen spectrum

D. Change of photon--------------S. β – decay
energy into kinetic--------------
energy of electrons--------------

===================

Solution

(A) -- (P), (R)
(B) ® (Q), (S),
(C) ® (P)
(D) ® (Q)
-----------------------------------
Q.4 JEE 2007 paper II

Column I gives some devices and Column II gives some processes on which the functioning of these devices depend. Match the devices in Column I with the processes in Column II and indicate your answer by darkening appropriate bubbles
in the 4 × 4 matrix given in the ORS.
--------Column I--------------Column II
(A) Bimetallic strip-----(P)Radiation from a hot body
(B) Steam engine-------- (Q)Energy conversion
(C) Incandescent lamp----(R) Melting
(D) Electric fuse--------(S) Thermal expansion of solids

Solution:

(A) – (S)
(B) – (Q)
(C) – (P), (Q)
(D) – (R), (Q)

(A) Bimetallic strip works on the principle of thermal expansion of solids.
(B) Steam engine converts steam energy into mechanical energy.
(C) Incandescent lamp works on the principle of radiation of body due to temperature.
(D) Electric fuse is a safety device which does not allow current more than its permissible value.
----------------------------
Q5. JEE 2007 Paper II

Column I describes some situations in which a small object moves. Column II describes some characteristics of these motions. Match the situations in Column I with the characteristics in Column II and indicate your answer by darkening
appropriate bubbles in the 4 × 4 matrix given in the ORS.

Column I is give first totally. and then Column II is given next.

A. The object moves on the x-axis under a conservative force in
such a way that its “speed” and “position” satisfy
v =c1*SQRT(c2-x^2), where c1 and c2 are positive constants.

B. The object moves on the x-axis in such a way that its velocity
and its displacement from the origin satisfy kx v − = , where k
is a positive constant.

C. The object is attached to one end of a mass less spring of a
given spring constant. The other end of the spring is attached
to the ceiling on an elevator. Initially everything is at rest. The
elevator starts going upwards with a constant acceleration a.
The motion of the object is observed from the elevator during
the period it maintains this acceleration.

D.The object is projected from the earth’s surface vertically
upwards with a speed SQRT(GM-e/R-e) , where, M-e is the mass
of the earth and R-e is the radius of the earth. Neglect forces
from objects other than the earth.


Column II

(P) The object executes a simple harmonic
motion.
(Q) The object does not change its direction
(R) The kinetic energy of the object keeps on
decreasing
(S) The object can change its direction only once.


Solution:

(A) – (P)
(B) – (Q), (R)
(C) – (P)
(D) – (Q), (R)
--------------------------------------------

Tuesday, October 23, 2007

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 1 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS

H C Verma Book Sections

1.1 What is Physics
1.2 Physics and Mathematics
1.3 Units
1.4 Definitions of base units
1.5 Dimension
1.6 Uses of dimension
1.7 Order of magnitude
1.8 The structure of world

Study Plan

Study plan basically consists of 10 days of study and problems solving. Additional 10 days is for revision and for solving some more problems from the book, if you could not complete them during the first 10 days. Each day spend at least one hour for this subject for the main chapter and may be 15 minutes to 30 minutes for revising the earlier chapter. Thus you have to allot at least three hours and forty five minutes every day for your self study. It will be good when you are able to combine your self study with the lecture that is going in the school and coaching class. That way you will be able to complete self study in lesser time and get the benefit of reinforcement.

Day 1

Study

1.1 What is Physics
1.2 Physics and Mathematics
1.3 Units
1.4 Definitions of base units
1.5 Dimension

Do example 1.1
Do worked out examples 1 and 2

Day 2

Study

1.6 Uses of dimension

Do example 1.2
Do worked out examples 3,4,5,6

Day 3

Study

1.7 Order of magnitude
1.8 The structure of world

Do worked out examples 7 to 10

Day 4

Revise the chapter

Answer Objective I and II

Day 5

Solve Exercises 1 to 5

Day 6

Solve Exercises 6 to 10

Day 7

Solve Exercises 11 to 15

Day 8

Solve Exercises 16 to 19

Day 9 to 20
Keep revising principles, and have a look at difficult problems. If you come across any other text book, answer problems in that textbook on these topics.

By the end of these 20 days, you must be very thorough with this chapter. You are ready to write examination on this chapter at any time from today.

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 2 PHYSICS AND MATHEMATICS

HCV Chapter Sections

2.1 Vectors and scalars
2.2 Equality of vectors
2.3 Addition of vectors
2.4 Multiplication of a vector by a number
2.5 Subtraction of vectors
2.6 Resolution of vectors
2.7 DCT product or scalar product of two vectors
2.8 Cross product or vector product of two vectors
2.9 Differential calculus: dy/dx as rate measure
2.10 Maxima and Minima
2.11 Integral calculus
2.12 Significant digits
2.13 Significant digits in calculations
2.14 Errors in measurements


Study Plan

Day 1

2.1 Vectors and scalars
2.2 Equality of vectors
2.3 Addition of vectors
Example 2.1
2.4 Multiplication of a vector by a number
2.5 Subtraction of vectors
Example 2.2

Day 2


2.6 Resolution of vectors
Example 2.3
2.7 DOT product or scalar product of two vectors
Example 2.4

Worked out examples 1 to 4

Day 3

2.8 Cross product or vector product of two vectors

Example 2.5

Worked out example 5 to 10.

Day 4

2.9 Differential calculus: dy/dx as rate measure
Ex. 2.6, 2.7
2.10 Maxima and Minima
Ex.2.8


Day 5

2.11 Integral calculus
Ex. 2.9

Worked out examples 11 to 13

Day 6

2.12 Significant digits
2.13 Significant digits in calculations
Ex. 2.10 to 2.12

Worked out examples 14 to 17

Day 7
2.14 Errors in measurements
Ex. 2.13

Worked example 18

Exercise Problems: 1 to 4

Day 8
Objective I
Exercise Problems 5 to 8

Day 9
Objective II
Exercise Problems 9 to 12

Day 10
Exercise Problems 13 to 20

Day 11 Your are entering into revision 10 days

Exercise problems 21,22

Day 12
Exercise problems 23,24

Day 13
Exercise problems 25,26

Day 14
Exercise problems 27,28

Day 15
Exercise problems 29,30

Day 16
Exercise problems 31,32

Day 17
Exercise problems 33,34

Day 18
Exercise problems 35

Day 19
Attempt Questions for short answer 1 to 7

Day 20
Exercise problems
Attempt Questions for short answer 8 to 14





Web sites
lecture notes - Vectors
http://plasma4.sr.unh.edu/ng/phys407/phys407-6-16-05.pdf

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 3 REST AND MOTION - KINEMATICS

Inertial and uniformly accelerated frames of reference;
-----------

HCV Chapter Sections

3.1 Rest and Motion
3.2 Distance and displacement
3.3 average speed and instantaneous speed
3.4 Average velocity and instantaneous velocity
3.5 Average accleration and instantaneous aceleration
3.6 Motion in a straight line
3.7 Motion in a plane
3.8 Projectile motion
3.9 Change of frame
-------

Study Plan
Day 1

3.1 Rest and Motion
3.2 Distance and displacement
Ex. 3.1
3.3 average speed and instantaneous speed
Ex. 3.2,3.3
Worked out example 1

Points to Note in the session
http://iit-jee-physics.blogspot.com/2009/05/physics-study-diary-for-iit-jee-2011.html

Day 2

4. Average velocity and instantaneous velocity
Ex. 3.4
Worked out example 2
3.5 Average accleration and instantaneous aceleration

Exercises: 1 to 5

Points to Note in the session
http://iit-jee-physics.blogspot.com/2009/05/physics-study-diary-for-iit-jee-ch3.html

Day 3

3.6 Motion in a straight line
Ex. 3.5.3.6, 3.7
WOE 3 to 6

Points to Note in the session
http://iit-jee-physics.blogspot.com/2009/05/iit-jee-physics-study-diary-ch3-rest.html

Day 4

3.7 Motion in a plane
Ex. 3.8
3.8 Projectile motion
Ex. 3.9
WOE 11,12, 14


Day 5

3.9 Change of frame
Ex. 3.10, 3.11
WOE 16,17, 18

Day 6
Formula Revision
http://iit-jee-physics.blogspot.com/2008/02/iit-jee-physics-formula-revision-3-rest.html
WOE 7 to 10, and 13,15, 19,20

Day 7

Exercises 6 to 15

Day 8
Exercises 16 to 25

Day 9

Exercises 26 to 35

Day 10
Exercises 36 to 45

Revision Period

Day 11
Exercises 46 to 50


Day 12
Exercises 51,52
Objective I


Day 13
Exercises
Objective II


Day 14
Exercises
Question for short answer


Day 15
Concept review
http://iit-jee-physics.blogspot.com/2008/05/concept-review-chapter-3-rest-and.html


Day 16
Formula review
http://iit-jee-physics.blogspot.com/2008/02/iit-jee-physics-formula-revision-3-rest.html


Day 17 to 20
Test paper problems 10 per day can be solved.







Inertial and accelerated frames of reference.

Section 3.9 covers material related to it. But it is not using the terms inertial frame of reference.


------
Past JEE question
1982

A particle is moving eastwards with a velocity 5 m/s. In 10 seconds the velocity changes to 5 m/s northwards. The average acceleration in this time is

a) zero

b) [1/Sqrt(2)]m/s^2 towards northwest

c) 1/2 m/s^2 towards northwest

d) 1/2 m/s^2 towards north

Answer b.
You can find acceleration in the direction of west and check that velocity become zero in east direction in 5 seconds and also velocity in north direction becomes 5 m/s.

----------------------
Audio visual lectures

http://www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson01/Container.html

Motion in two dimensions (plane)
http://www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson02/Container.html


web sites

one dimensional motion
http://plasma4.sr.unh.edu/ng/phys407/phys407-6-15-05.pdf

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch.4 THE FORCES

The study guides provides only the main issues covered in the chapter to provide some introduction to the chapter. Some past JEE questions are provided to link the issues in the chapter to questions.

One has to read the chapter fully. Study all solved examples and solve exercise problems.

The points may be used as revision points later.
------------------------------


No topic in JEE syllabus. But study of the chapter is necessary as there are full chapters on each of these topics later on and this introduction is essential to understand the in depth chapters.

-----------------

Sections

4.1 Introduction
4.2 Gravitational forces
4.3 Electromagnetic (EM) forces
4.4 Nuclear Forces
4.5 Weak forces
4.6 Scope of Classical physics

---------

Study Plan

Day 1

4.1 Introduction
4.2 Gravitational forces

Session important points

http://iit-jee-physics.blogspot.com/2009/05/physics-study-diary-ch-4-forces-day-1.html


Day 2
4.3 Electromagnetic (EM) forces
Ex. 4.1

Session - important points
http://iit-jee-physics.blogspot.com/2009/05/iit-jee-physics-study-diary-ch3-forces.html

Day 3

4.4 Nuclear Forces
4.5 Weak forces
4.6 Scope of Classical physics


Session important points
http://iit-jee-physics.blogspot.com/2009/05/iit-jee-2011-physics-study-diary-ch4.html

Day 4
Worked out examples 1 to 3
Exercises 1 to 7

Day 5
Exercises 8 top 12
Objective I and II

Day 6
Questions for short answer 1 to 10
Concept Review
Formula Review

Day 7 to 20
Revision of all the four chapters completed so far.

Don't waste the time available. Always use the time to revision the concepts, formulas, difficult problems and to do test paper questions. You have to sqeeze the time every day and use it in a focused way.

Master each chapter as early as possible. That will give the energy to study one more chapter. Always feel happy after you do the planned work for a day. That will relax you. The feeling of happiness after you complete the day's task will relax you and make you feel energetic to eat and sleep and if some time is there to see the TV or read a paper or talk to your parents. It is important to focus, put in the required effort and then feel happy and relax every day.









Concepts covered

Force is an interaction between two objects. Force is exerted by an object A on another object B
Force is a vector quantity.

If more than one force act on a particle, we can find the resultant force using the laws of vector addition.

Gravitational forces

Any two bodies attract each other by virtue of their masses.

The force of attraction between two point masses is

F = G m1m2/r^2

where m1 and m2 are the masses of the particles and r is the distance between them.

G is a universal constant having the value 6.67 x 10^-11 N-m²/kg²

Gravitational force on small bodies by the earth

For earth, the value of radius R and mass M are 6400 km and 6 x 10^24 kg respectively.

The quantity GM/r² is a constant and has the dimensions of acceleration. It is called acceleration due to gravity and is denoted by letter g.

g and G are different.


Electro magnetic force:

Apart from gravitational force between any two bodies, the particles may exert upon each other electromagnetic forces.

If two particles hving charges q1 and q2 are at rest with respect to the observer, the force between them has a magnitude

F = (1/4πε0)(q1q2/r^2)

Where ε0 = permittivity of air or vacuum = 8.8549 x 10^-12 C² /N-m²
The quantity (1/4πε0) = 9.0 x 10^9 N-m² /C²

q1, q2 = charges
r distance between q1 and q2

This is called coulomb force and it acts along the line joining the particles.

Force due to a spring

When a metallic wire is coiled it becomes a spring.

when a spring is stretched, it pulls the bodies attached to its ends and when compressed, it pushes the bodies attached to its ends. the force exerted by thes spring is proportional to the change in its length.

If the spring has natural length of x0 and if it is changed to x, the magnitude of force exerted by the spring will be

f = k|x-x0| = k|Δx|

If the spring is extended, the force will be directed towards its centre and it compressed, it will be directed away from its centre.

Nuclear forces

The alpha particles is a bare nucleus of Helium. It contains two protons and two neutrons. It is a stable object and once created it can remain intact until it is not made to interact with other objects.

The protons in the nucleus will repel each other due to coulomb force and try to break the nucleus. Why does the Coulomb force fail to break the nucleus.

There are forces called nucluear forces and they are exerted only if the interacting particles are protons or neutrons or both. They are largely atractive, but with a short range. They are weaker than the Coulomb force if the separation between particles is more than 10^-14 m. For separation smaller than this the nuclear force is stronger than the Coulomb force and it holds the nucleus stable.

Radioactivity, nuclear energy (fission, fusion) etc. result from nuclear force.

Weak Forces

A neutron can change into proton and simulataneously emit an electron and a particle called antinutrino.

a proton can also change into neutron and simulataneously emit a positron (and a neutrino). The forces responsible for these changes are called weak forces. The effect of this force is experienced inside protons and neutrons only.


Scope of classical physics

Physics based on Newton's Laws of motion, Newton's law of gravitation, Maxwell's electromagetism, laws of thermodynamics and the Lorentz force is called classical physics. The behaviour of all the bodies of linear sizes greater than 10^-6 m are adequately described by classical physics. Grains of sands and rain drops fall into this range as well as heavenly bodies.

But sub atomic particles like atoms, nuclei, and electrons have sizes smaller than 10^-6 m and they are explained by quantum physics.

The mechanics of particles moving at velocity equal to light are explained by relativistic mechanics formulated by Einstein in 1905.



http://plasma4.sr.unh.edu/ng/phys407/phys407-6-22-05.pdf

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 5 NEWTON'S LAWS OF MOTION

Newton’s laws of motion;
--------------
Main Sections

5.1 Newton's First law
5.2 Newton's second law
5.3 Working with Newton's laws
5.4 Newton's third law of motion
5.5 Pseudo forces
5.6 The Horse and the cart
5.7 Inertia

---------------------
Subsections under each main section

5.1 First law of motion
Inertial frames other than earth
5.2 Newton's second law
5.3 Working with Newton's laws
5.4 Newton's third law of motion
5.5 Pseudo forces
5.6 The Horse and the cart
5.7 Inertia

------------
Study Plan

Day 1

5.1 First law of motion


Example 5.1

W.O.E. 1 and 2

http://iit-jee-physics.blogspot.com/2008/08/newtons-laws-of-motion-study-plan.html

Day 2

5.2 Newton's second law
5.3 Working with Newton's laws

W.O.E. 3 and 4

Points to be noted
http://iit-jee-physics.blogspot.com/2008/09/newtons-laws-of-motion-study-plan.html

Day 3

5.4 Newton's third law of motion

W.O.E. 5,6

Day 4

5.5 Pseudo forces

W.O.E. 7,8

Day 5
5.6 The Horse and the cart
5.7 Inertia

W.O.E. 9,10,11

Day 6

Objective I

Day 7

Objective II

Day 8

Exercises 1 to 5

Day 9

Exercises 6 to 10

Day 10

Exercises 11 to 15

Day 11

Exercises 16 to 18

Day 12

Exercises 19 to 21

Day 13

Exercises 22 to 24

Day 14

Exercises 25 to 27

Day 15

Exercises 28 to 30

Day 16

Exercises 31 to 33

Day 17

Exercises 34 to 36

Day 18

Exercises 37 to 39

Day 19

Exercises 40 to 42

Day 20

Attempt Questions for short Answer 1 to 17



Audiovisual lecture
Newton's first law
http://www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson03/Container.html

Newton's second law
http://www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson04/Container.html

Newton's thrid law
http://www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson05/Container.html

Newton's laws - applications
http://www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson06/Container.html

Websites

plasma4.sr.unh.edu/ng/phys407/phys407-6-23-05.pdf
-----------------
JEE Question 2007 Paper II

Statement - 1

A cloth covers a table. Some dishes are kept on it. The cloth can be pulled out without dislodging the dishes from the table.

Because

Statement - 2

For every action there is an equal an opposite reaction.

(A) Statement – 1 is True, Statement – 2 is True; Statement – 2 is a correct explanation for statement – 1
(B) Statement – 1 is True, Statement – 2 is True; Statement – 2 is Not a correct explanation for Statement – 1.
(C) Statement – 1 is True, Statement – 2 is False
(D) Statement – 1 is False, Statement – 2 is True

Correct choice: (B)
S1 is correct.
S2 is also correct but it does not explain S1. S1 is possible because of inertia.
-----------------------




---------
JEE Question 2007 Paper I

Two particles of mass m each are tied at the ends of a light string of
length 2a. The whole system is kept on a frictionless horizontal surface
with the string held tight so that each mass is at a distance ‘a’ from the
centre P (as shown in the figure. *figure not given in this post). Now, the mid-point of the string is pulled vertically upwards with a small but constant force F. As a result,the particles move towards each other on the surface. The magnitude of
acceleration, when the separation between them becomes 2x, is

(A) (F/2m)(a/SQRT(a^2-x^2))
(B) (F/2m)(x/SQRT(a^2-x^2))
(C) (F/2m)(x/a)
(D) (F/2m)(SQRT(a^2-x^2)/x)

Solution: B

Imagine the string being pulled upward from midpoint, but only horizontal movement is there.Assume that the string makes with the horizontal surface is θ (theta) , and the tension in the string is T.

F = 2Tsinθ (Tension in each side of the string)
Force in the horintal direction on each particle = F' = ma = T Cosθ
So a = T Cosθ/m
T = F/2Sinθ
a = (F/2m)cotθ

In the triange formed between half of the string and horizontal surface,and the imaginary vertical line through which force is being applied, diagonal is half of the string hence a, and the horizontal side is x. The third side is SQRT(a^2-x^2)
Hence cotθ = x/SQRT(a^2-x^2)

a = (F/2m)(x/SQRT(a^2-x^2))
---------------------

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 6 FRICTION

JEE Syllabus

Static and dynamic friction;
----
Sections of the chapter

6.1 Friction as the component of contact force
6.2 Kinetic friction
6.3 Static friction
6.4 Laws of friction
6.5 Understandng friction at atomic level
6.6 A Laboratory method to measure friction coefficient

--------

Study Plan

Day 1

6.1 Friction as the component of contact force
Example 6.1
6.2 Kinetic friction
Example 6.2

Day 2

6.3 Static friction
Ex. 6.3
W.O.E. 1,2,3,4

Day 3
6.4 Laws of friction
W.O.E. 5 to 8

Day 4

6.5 Understandng friction at atomic level
6.6 A Laboratory method to measure friction coefficient
Ex. 6.4
W.O.E. 9,10

Day 5

Objective I

Day 6

Objective II

Day 7

Exercises 1 to 5

Day 8

Exercises 6 to 10

Day 9

Exercises 11 to 15

Day 10

Exercises 16 to 20

Revision Period

Day 11

Exercises 21 to 23

Day 12

Exercises 24 to 27

Day 13

Exercises 28 to 30

Day 14

Exercises 31,

Day 15

Questions for Short Answer: 1 to 11






-----------
web sites
lecture notes
http://plasma4.sr.unh.edu/ng/phys407/phys407-6-27-05.pdf


----------------
JEE question 2007 paper I

STATEMENT-1

A block of mass m starts moving on a rough horizontal surface with a velocity v. It stops due to friction between the block and the surface after moving through a certain distance. The surface is now tilted to an angle of 30 degrees with the horizontal and the same block is made to go up on the surface with the same initial velocity v. The decrease in the mechanical energy in the second situation is smaller than that in the first situation.

because

STATEMENT-2

The coefficient of friction between the block and the surface decreases with the increase in the angle of inclination.

(A) Statement-1 is True, Statement-2 is True; Statement-2 is a correct explanation for Statement-1
(B) Statement-1 is True, Statement-2 is True; Statement-2 is NOT a correct explanation for Statement-1
(C) Statement-1 is True, Statement-2 is False
(D) Statement-1 is False, Statement-2 is True


Correct choice: (C)

Coefficient of friction doesn’t depend on the angle of inclination of the plane.

----------------------------------------

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 7 CIRCULAR MOTION

JEE Syllabus

Uniform Circular motion;


-----------
Sections of the chapter

7.1 Angular variables
7.2 Unit vectors along the radius and the tangent
7.3 Acceleration in circular motion
7.4 Dynamics of circular motion
7.5 Circular turnings and banking of roads
7.6 Centrifugal force
7.7 Effect of earth's rotation on apprarent weight

------------

Study Plan

Day 1

7.1 Angular variables
Ex. 7.1, 7.2
7.2 Unit vectors along the radius and the tangent

Day 2
7.3 Acceleration in circular motion
Ex. 7.3,7.4
7.4 Dynamics of circular motion
Ex. 7.5
W.O.E. 3,4,5,7

Day 3
7.5 Circular turnings and banking of roads
Ex. 7.6
W.O.E. 1 and 2

Day 4

7.6 Centrifugal force
w.O.E. 7, 8,9,10,

Day 5

7.7 Effect of earth's rotation on apprarent weight
Ex. 7.7
w.O.E. 11 to 13

Day 6
Objective I

Day 7

Objective II

Day 8

Exercises 1 to 5

Day 9

Exercises 6 to 10

Day 10

Exercises 11 to 15

Revision period

Day 11

Exercises: 16 to 18

Day 12

Exercises: 19 to 21

Day 13

Exercises: 22 to 24

Day 14

Exercises: 25 to 27

Day 15

Exercises: 28 to 30

Day 16

Short answer questions: 1 to 10

Day 17

Try some past JEE questions

Day 18

Try some past JEE questions


Day 19

Try some past JEE questions


Day 20

Try some past JEE questions








Concepts covered

7.1 Angular variables

Angular position
angular velocity
Angular acceleration

Linear speed
Rate of change of speed
Tangential accelaration

7.2 Unit vectors along the radius and the tangent

radial unit vector
Tangential unit vector

7.3 Acceleration in circular motion

Uniform circular motion
Centripetal acceleration

radial component of acceleration
Tangential component of acceleration

7.4 Dynamics of circular motion

Centripetal force

7.5 Circular turnings and banking of roads

When vehicles go through turnings, they travel along a nearly circular arc. That means there is centrepetal accelaration. What forces cause this acceleration? Friction fs can act towards the centre. However this may not be sufficient and the vehicle may skid.

To take care of it, the roads are banked t the turn so that outer part of the road is somewhat lifted up as compared to the inner part. therefore the normal force makes an angle θ wit hte vertical. The horizontal component of the normal force helps in providing the accelaration required.

The θ required for a speed of the vehicle of v is given by

tanθ = v²/rg


7.6 Centrifugal force

What psuedo force is required if the frame of reference rotates at a constant angular velocity ω with respect to an inertial frame?

Cetrifugal force
Coriolis force

Note: It is a common minsconception among the beginners that centrifugal force acts on a particle because the particle goes on a circle. Centrigual force acts (or is assumed to act) becasue we describe the particle from a rotating frame which is noninertial and still use Newton's laws.

7.7 Effect of earth's rotation on apprarent weight

A plumb line stays in a direction which is different from true vertical to earth at that point. The walls of building are built by making them parallel to the plumb line and not to the true vertical.

The weight of a body is mg' and not mg and g' is less than g.
g' = g only at the poles as the poles themselved do not rotate and hence the effect of earth's rotation is not felt there.


---------
JEE Question 2007 Paper I

Two discs A and B are mounted coaxially on a vertical axle. The discs have moments of inertia I and 2I respectively about the common axis. Disc A is imparted an initial angular velocity 2w using the entire potential energy of a spring compressed by a distance x-1 . Disc B is imparted an angular velocity by a spring having the same spring constant and compressed by a distance x-2 . Both the discs rotate in the
clockwise direction


1. The ratio x-1 /x-2 is
(A) 2
(B)1/2
(C) SQRT(2)
(D)1/SQRT(2)

Answer C

2. When disc B is brought in contact with disc A, they acquire a common angular velocity in time t.The average frictional torque on one disc by the other during this period is


3.The loss of kinetic energy during the above process is

--------------------------

JEE question 2007 Paper II

A small object of uniform density rolls up a curved surface with an initial velocity v. It reaches up to a maximum height of 3v^2/4g with respect to the initial position. The object is

(A) ring
(B) solid sphere
(C) hollow sphere
(D) Disc

Answer: D
-------------------------------

JEE Question Paper II 2007

Statement - 1

If there is no external torque on a body about its center of mass, then the velocity of the center of mass remains constant.

Because

Statement - 2

The linear momentum of an isolated system remains constant.

(A) Statement – 1 is True, Statement – 2 is True; Statement – 2 is a correct explanation for statement – 1
(B) Statement – 1 is True, Statement – 2 is True; Statement – 2 is Not a correct explanation for Statement – 1.
(C) Statement – 1 is True, Statement – 2 is False
(D) Statement – 1 is False, Statement – 2 is True

Right choice; D
S1 is incorrect. without external torque but with external force the centre can move.
S2 is correct.
----------------------

JEE 2006

A solid sphere of mass M, radius R and having moment of inertia about an axis passing through the centre of mass as I, is recast into a disc of thickness t, whose moment of inertia about an axis passing through its edge and perpendicular to its plane remains I. Then, radius of the disc will be

(A) 2R/SQRT(15)

(B) R*(SQRT(2/15)
(C) 4R/SQRT(15)
(D) R/4

Answer: A
-------------------------

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 8 WORK AND ENERGY

Kinetic and potential energy;
Work and power; Conservation of linear momentum and mechanical energy.
-------
Sections covered

1. Kinetic enery
2. Work and work energy theorem
3. Calculation of work done
4. Work energy theorem for a system of particles
5. Potential energy
6. Conservative and nonconservative forces
7. Definition of Potential energy and conservation of mechanical energy
8. Change in the potential energy in a rigid body motion
9. Gravitational potential energy
10. Potential energy oif a compressed or extended spring
11. Different forms of energy: Mass energy equivalence
------


Study Plan
Day 1
1. Kinetic energy
2. Work and work energy theorem
3. Calculation of work done
Day 2
Ex. 8.1 and 8.2
Worked Out Examples (WOE): 1,2,3

Day 3
4. Work energy theorem for a system of particles
5. Potential energy
6. Conservative and nonconservative forces

Day 4
WOE 4,5,6
Exercises 1,2,3

Day 5
7. Definition of Potential energy and conservation of mechanical energy
Ex. 8.3
8. Change in the potential energy in a rigid body motion
9. Gravitational potential energy
Ex. 8.5

Day 6
WOE: 6,7,8
Exercises 4,5,6

Day 7

10. Potential energy of a compressed or extended spring
Ex. 8.6, 8.7,
11. Different forms of energy: Mass energy equivalence
WOE: 7 to 10

Day 8
WOE 11 to 14
Exercises: 7 to 10

Day 9
Exercises: 11 to 20

Day 10
Exercises: 21 to 30
Revision Period

Day 11
Exercises: 31 to 35

Day 12
Exercises: 36 to 40

Day 13
Exercises: 41 to 45

Day 14
Exercises: 46 to 50

Day 15
Exercises: 51 to 55

Day 16
Exercises: 56 to 60

Day 17
Exercises: 61 to 64

Day 18
Objective I

Day 19
Objective II

Day 20
Questions for Short Answer 1 to 17









--------------
Concepts covered

In the chapter initially kinetic energy is discussed. The potential energy is explained in terms of change in kinetic energy. In a system of two particles kinetic energy is decreased as the system moves from configuration 1 to configuration 2.As it comes back to configuration 1, the kinetic energy once again increases. This is due to potential energy into which the decrease in kinetic energy changes. Then potential energy and various forms of potential energy are explained.

In this context, concepts of conservative and nonconservative forces are introduced.

If the work done by a force depends only on the initial and final states and not on the path taken, it is called a conservative force. Force of gravity, Coulomb force, and the force of spring are conservative forces.

The force of friction is nonconservative because the work done by the friction is not zero in a round trip.

------
Audiovisual lectures

Work energy theorem
http://www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson07/Container.html

Conservative Forces and Potential Energy
http://www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson08/Container.html

Conservation of Energy
http://www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson09/Container.html

Power
http://www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson10/Container.html


websites
http://plasma4.sr.unh.edu/ng/phys407/phys407-6-29-05.pdf

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 9 CENTRE OF MASS, LINEAR MOMENTUM AND MASS

Centre of mass and its motion;
--------
Sections of the chapter
1. Centre of mass
2. Centre of mass og continuous bodies
3. Motion of the Centre of mass


---------------
Study Plan

Day 1

1. Centre of mass

Ex. 9.1, 9.2
2. Centre of mass of continuous bodies
Worked out examples (WOE): 1 to 3

Day 2
3. Motion of the Centre of mass
Ex. 9.3
4. Linear momentum and its conservation principle
5. Rocket propulsion

Day 3
WOE 4,5,6,7,8
Exercises 1 to 5

Day 4

6. Collision
Ex. 9.4
7. Elastic collision in one dimension
WOE 9 to 12

Day 5
8. Perfectly inelastic collision in one dimension
Ex. 9.5
9. Coefficient of restitution
10. Elastic collision in two dimensions
11. Impulse and impulsive force
WOE 13 to 14

Day 6
Objective I 1ot 19

Day 7
Objective II 1 to 11

Day 8
WOE 15 to 20
Exercises 6 to 10

Day 9
WOE 21 to 24
Exercises 11 to 15

Day 10
Exercises 16 to 25
Revison Period

Day 11
Exercises 26 to 30


Day 12
Exercises 31 to 35


Day 13
Exercises 36 to 40


Day 14
Exercises 41 to 45


Day 15
Exercises 46 to 50


Day 16
Exercises 51 to 55


Day 17
Exercises 56 to 60


Day 18
Exercises 61 to 64

Day 19
Questions for Short Answer 1 to 12


Day 20
Questions for Short Answer 13 to 25






-----------------
Audio visual lecture

Center of Mass
www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson11/Container.html

Impulse and Momentum
www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson12/Container.html


Conservation of Linear Momentum, Collisions
www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson13/Container.html


----------------
JEE question 2007 paper I

STATEMENT-1

In an elastic collision between two bodies, the relative speed of the bodies after collision is equal to the relative speed before
the collision

because

STATEMENT-2

In an elastic collision, the linear momentum of the system is conserved

(A) Statement-1 is True, Statement-2 is True; Statement-2 is a correct explanation for Statement-1
(B) Statement-1 is True, Statement-2 is True; Statement-2 is NOT a correct explanation for Statement-1
(C) Statement-1 is True, Statement-2 is False
(D) Statement-1 is False, Statement-2 is True

Correct choice: (B)
------------------------------

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 10 ROTATIONAL MECHANICS

JEE syllabus

Dynamics of rigid bodies with fixed axis of rotation; Rolling without slipping of rings, cylinders and spheres;
---------

1. Rotation of a rigid body
2. Kinematics
3. Rotational dynamics
4. Torque of a force about the axis of rotation
5. Г = Iα
6. Bodies in Equilibrium
7. Bending of a Cyclist on horizontal turn
8. Angular momentum
9. L = Iα
10. Conservation of Angular Momentum
11. Angular impulse
12. Kinetic energy of a rigid body rotating about a given axis
13. Rolling
14. Calculation of Momentum of inertia
15. Two important theorems on moment of inertia
16. Combined rotation and translation
17. Rolling
18. Kinetic energy of a body in combined rotation and translation
19. Angular momentum of a body in combined rotation and translation
20. why does a rolling sphere slow down

-----------

Study Plan

Day 1

1. Rotation of a rigid body
2. Kinematics
Exmples 10.1,2 and 3

Day 2
3. Rotational dynamics
4. Torque of a force about the axis of rotation
Ex. 10.4
Worked Out Examples: 1,2

Day 3
5. Г = Iα
Ex. 10.5
6. Bodies in Equilibrium
7. Bending of a Cyclist on horizontal turn
WOE: 3,4

Day 4
8. Angular momentum
9. L = Iα
10. Conservation of Angular Momentum
Ex. 10.6
WOE: 5,6

Day 5
11. Angular impulse
12. Kinetic energy of a rigid body rotating about a given axis
Ex. 10.7
13. Rolling
WOE: 7,8

Day 6
14. Calculation of Momentum of inertia
WOE: 9,10

Day 7
15. Two important theorems on moment of inertia
WOE: 11,12

Day 8
16. Combined rotation and translation
17. Rolling
WOE: 13,14

Day 9
18. Kinetic energy of a body in combined rotation and translation
19. Angular momentum of a body in combined rotation and translation
20. why does a rolling sphere slow down
WOE: 15,16

Day 10
WOE: 17 to 29

Day 11
Exercises: 1 to 5


Day 12
Exercises: 6 to 10


Day 13
Exercises: 11 to 15


Day 14
Exercises: 16 to 20


Day 15
Exercises: 21 to 25


Day 16
Exercises: 26 to 30


Day 17
Exercises: 31 to 35


Day 18
Exercises: 36 to 40

Day 19
Exercises: 41 to 45


Day 20
Exercises: 46 to 50

Still 36 problems are there in the chapter that you have to do as a special task.

---------------------
Audiovisual lecture

Uniform Circular Motion
www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson14/Container.html

Torque and Rotational Statics
www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson15/Container.html


http://plasma4.sr.unh.edu/ng/phys407/phys407-7-13-05.pdf

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 11 GRAVITATION

JEE syllabus

Law of gravitation; Gravitational potential and field; Acceleration due to gravity; Motion of planets and satellites in circular orbits; Escape velocity.
---------
Sections in H C Verma

1. Historical Introduction
2. Measurement of Gravitational Constant G
3. Gravitational Potential Energy
4. Gravitational Potential
5. Calculation of Gravitational Potential
6. Gravitational Field
7. Relation between Gravitational Potential and Field
8. Calculation of Gravitational Field
9. Variation in the Value of G
10.Planets and Satellites
11.Kepler's laws
12.Weightlessness in a Satellite
13. Escape Velocity
14. Gravitational Binding Energy
15. Blackholes
16. Inertial and Gravitational Mass
17. Possible Changes in the Law of Gravitation
---------

Study Plan


Day 1

1. Historical Introduction
Ex. 11.1

Day 2
2. Measurement of Gravitational Constant G
3. Gravitational Potential Energy
Ex. 11.2
4. Gravitational Potential

Day 3
5. Calculation of Gravitational Potential
Ex. 11.3
Worked Out Examples: 1,2


Day 4

6. Gravitational Field
Ex. 11.4
7. Relation between Gravitational Potential and Field
Ex. 11.5
WOE 3,4

Day 5
8. Calculation of Gravitational Field
Ex. 11.6, and 7
WOE 5,6

Day 6
9. Variation in the Value of G
Ex. 11.8
10.Planets and Satellites
11.9
11.Kepler's laws
12.Weightlessness in a Satellite

Day 7
13. Escape Velocity
Ex. 11.10
14. Gravitational Binding Energy
15. Blackholes

Day 8

16. Inertial and Gravitational Mass
17. Possible Changes in the Law of Gravitation
WOE 7 to 9

Day 9
WOE 10 to 13
Exercises 1 to 5

Day 10
Exercises 6 to 15

Day 11
Exercises 16 to 20

Day 12
Exercises 21 to 25

Day 13
Exercises 26 to 30

Day 14
Exercises 31 to 35

Day 15
Exercises 36 to 39

Day 16
Objective I

Day 17
Objectve II
Questions for Short Answer 1 to 5

Day 18
Questions for Short Answer 6 to 10

Day 19
Questions for Short Answer 11 to 15

Day 20
Questions for Short Answer 16 to 19






------------------
Law of gravitation

Eq (11.1) oin H C Verma

F = GMm/r²

The above equation is known as the universal law of gravitation

G = 6.67*10^-11 N-m² /kg²

Gravitational potential and field

Gravitational potential at a point is equal to the change in potential energy per unit mass, as the mass is brought from the reference point to the given point.

Gravitational field: It is assumed that a body say A, creates a gravitational field in the space around it. The field has its own existence and has energy and momentum. When another body B is placed in gravitational field of a body, this field exerts a force on it. The direction and intensity of the field is defined in terms of the force it exerts on a body placed in it.

The intensity of gravitational field vector E at a point is defined by the equation

vector E = force vector F/mass

where F is the force vector exerted by the field on a body of mass m placed in the field. The intensity of gravitational field is abbreviated as gravitational field. Its SI unit is N/kg.

By the way they are defined, intensity of gravitational field and acceleration due to gravity have equal magnitudes and directions, but they are two separate physical quantities.

Obtaining gravitational potential from gravitational field: If intensity of gravitational field E is defined in term of r the distance from the body exerting the gravitational force, its potential can be obtained by integrating e with respect to r ( ∫Edr).

If the potential is known, then its partial derivatives with respect to x, y, and z can be taken and they can be combined to get E, the intensity of gravitation field.

E = iEx + jEy + kEz









http://plasma4.sr.unh.edu/ng/phys407/phys407-7-27-05.pdf

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 12 SIMPLE HARMONIC MOTION

JEE Syllabus

Linear and angular simple harmonic motions
------------------
1. Simple harmonic motion
2. Qualitative nature of simple harmonic motion
3. Equation of motion of a simple harmonic motion
4. Terms associated with simple harmonic motion
5. Simple harmonic motion as a projection of circular motion
6. Energy conservation in Simple harmonic motion
7. Angular simple harmonic motion
8. Simple pendulum
9. Physical pendulum
10.Torsional pendulum
11. Composition of two Simple harmonic motions
12. Damped harmonic motion
13. Forced oscillation and resonance

----------

Study Plan

Day 1
1. Simple harmonic motion
Ex. 12.1
2. Qualitative nature of simple harmonic motion
Ex. 12.2
3. Equation of motion of a simple harmonic motion

Day 2

4. Terms associated with simple harmonic motion
Ex. 12.3, 12.4
5. Simple harmonic motion as a projection of circular motion
6. Energy conservation in Simple harmonic motion
Ex. 12.5
Worked Out Examples 1 and 2

Day 3

7. Angular simple harmonic motion
Ex. 12.6
8. Simple pendulum
Ex. 12.7, 12.8
WOE 3,4

Day 4
9. Physical pendulum
Ex. 12.9
10.Torsional pendulum
12.10
WOE 5,6

Day 5
11. Composition of two Simple harmonic motions
Ex. 12.11
WOE 7,8

Day 6
12. Damped harmonic motion
13. Forced oscillation and resonance
WOE 9,10

Day 7
WOE 11 to 15
Exercises 1 to 5

Day 8
WOE 16 to 20
Exercises 6 to 10

Day 9
WOE 21,22
Exercises 11 to 18

Day 10
Exercises 19 to 30

Revision Period - Half an hour per day

Day 11
Exercises 31 to 35

Day 12
Exercises 36 to 40

Day 13
Exercises 41 to 45

Day 14
Exercises 46 to 50

Day 15
Exercises 51 to 55

Day 16
Exercises 56 to 58

Day 17
Objective I

Day 18
Objective II

Day 19
Questions for short answer 1 to 8

Day 20
Questions for short answer 9 to 16

----------
Audio visual lecture
Lesson 16: Simple Harmonic Motion
www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson16/Container.html


http://plasma4.sr.unh.edu/ng/phys407/phys407-7-28-05.pdf

IIT JEE Study Guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 13 FLUID MECHANICS

JEE Syllabus

Pressure in a fluid; Pascal’s law; Buoyancy; Surface energy and surface tension, capillary rise; Viscosity (Poiseuille’s equation excluded), Stoke’s law; Terminal velocity, Streamline flow, equation of continuity, Bernoulli’s theorem and its applications.

--------------
Sections in Chapter

1. Fluids
2. Pressure in a fluid
3. Pascal's law
4. Atmospheric pressure
5. Archimedes' Principle
6. Pressure difference and buoyant force in accelerating fluids
7. Flow of fluids
8. Steady and turbulent flow
9. Irrotational flow of an incompressible and nonviscous fluid
10. Equation of continuity
11. Bernoulli's equation
12 Application of Bernoulli's equation
-----------
Study Plan

Day 1

1. Fluids
2. Pressure in a fluid
3. Pascal's law

Day 2
4. Atmospheric pressure
5. Archimedes' Principle
Ex. 13.2
6. Pressure difference and buoyant force in accelerating fluids

Day 3
7. Flow of fluids
8. Steady and turbulent flow
9. Irrotational flow of an incompressible and nonviscous fluid
Worked Out Examples: 1,2

Day 4
10. Equation of continuity
WOE 3 to 8

Day 5
11. Bernoulli's equation
WOE 9,10

Day 6
12 Application of Bernoulli's equation
WOE 11
Exercises 1 to 5

Day 7
Exercises 6 to 15

Day 8
Exercises 16 to 25

Day 9
Exercises 26 to 35

Day 10
Objective I and II

Revision Period 30 minutes per day

Day 11
Short answer questions 1 to 8


Day 12
Short Answer Questions 9 to 16


Day 13
Concept review


Day 14
Formula review


Day 15 to 20 Revision or problems test paper books


-------------
Links for
Audiovisual lectures

Lesson 21: Hydrostatic Pressure
www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson21/Container.html

Lesson 22: Buoyancy
www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson227/Container.html

Lesson 23: Fluid Flow Continuity
www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson23/Container.html

Lesson 24: Bernoulli's Equation
www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson24/Container.html

IIT JEE Study Guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 14 SOME MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MATTER

JEE syllabus
Hooke’s law 14.5,
Young’s modulus 14.5, 14.8

Viscosity (Poiseuille's equation excluded) (14.15),
Stoke's law (14.17);
Terminal velocity(14.18),
-----------
Sections in the Chapter

1. Molecular structure of the material
2. Elasticity
3. Stress
4. Strain
5. Hooke's law & Young's modulus
6. Relation between longitudinal stress and strain
7. Elastic potential energy of a strained body
8 Determination of Young's modulus
9. Surface tension
10. Surface energy
11. Excess pressure inside a drop
12. Excess pressure in a soap bubble
13. Contact angle
14. Rise of a liquid in a capillary tube
15. Viscosity
16. Flow through a narrow tube: Poiseuille's equation
17. Stokes law
18. Terminal velocity
19. Measuring coefficient of viscosity by Stokes' method
20. Critical velocity and Reynold's number

----------
Study Plan

Day 1

1. Molecular structure of the material
2. Elasticity
3. Stress
Ex. 14.1

Day 2
4. Strain
5. Hooke's law & Young's modulus
Ex. 14.2
Worked Out Examples 1 to 3

Day 3
6. Relation between longitudinal stress and strain
7. Elastic potential energy of a strained body
Ex. 14.3
WOE 4
Exercises 1 to 5

Day 4
8 Determination of Young's modulus
9. Surface tension
Ex.14.4
10. Surface energy
Ex. 14.5
WOE 5,6

Day 5
WOE 7 to 10
Exercises 6 to 10


Day 6
11. Excess pressure inside a drop
12. Excess pressure in a soap bubble
13. Contact angle
14. Rise of a liquid in a capillary tube
WOE 11,12

Day 7
15. Viscosity
16. Flow through a narrow tube: Poiseuille's equation
17. Stokes law
WOE 13,14

Day 8
18. Terminal velocity
19. Measuring coefficient of viscosity by Stokes' method
20. Critical velocity and Reynold's number
WOE 15 to 17

Day 9

Exercises 11 to 20

Day 10
Exercises: 21 to 30


Revision Period: 30 minutes

Day 11
Exercises: 31,32
Objective I: 1 to 15


Day 12
Objective I: 16 to 29


Day 13
Objective II: 7


Day 14
Questions for Short Answer: 1 to 10


Day 15
Questions for Short Answer: 11 to 18


Day 16
Concept review


Day 17
Formula review


Day 18 to 20 Revision and problems from test paper guides

-------------------

Some Important concepts


Hooke's law

If the deformation is small, the stress in a body is proportional to the corresponding strain.

Tensile stress/Tensile strain = Y.

Y is a constant for a given material. This ratio is called Young's modulus for the material.


Stokes law (Ch. 14.17)

The viscous force ating on a small sphere, falling through a medium is equal to 6πηrv, where r is the radius of the sphere, v is velocity of the sphere, and η is the coefficient of viscosity of the medium.

Terminal velocity (Ch 14.18)
The viscous force on a solid moving through a fluid is proportional to its velocity (see stokes law).

When a solid is dropped in a fluid, the forces acting on it are

a. weight W acting vertically downward.
b. the viscous force F acting vertically upward and tbe buoyancy force acting vertically upward.

Weight and buoyancy forces are constant but viscous force changes with velocity.

If initially velocity is zero, viscous force is zero and the body is accelerated due to the forces W-B. As the body accelerates and velocity increases, viscous forces keeps increasing and at a certain instant it becomes equal to W-B. the net force becomes zero at that point and then onwards solid falls with constant velocity.

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 16 SOUND WAVES

JEE syllabus

Vibration of air columns;Resonance; Beats; Speed of sound in gases; Doppler effect (in sound).
----------
Sections of the chapter

1 The nature and propagation of sound waves
2. Displacement wave and pressure wave
3. Speed of a sound wave in a material medium
4. Speed of sound in a gas
5. Effect of pressure, temperature and humidity on the speed of sound in air
6. Intensity of sound waves
7. Appearance of sound to human ear
8. Interference of sound waves
9. Standing longitudinal waves and vibrations of air columns
10. Determination of speed of sound in air
11. Beats
12. Diffraction
13 Doppler effect
14. Sonic booms
15. Musical scale
16. Accoustics of buildings
--------------
Study Plan

Day 1

1 The nature and propagation of sound waves
Ex. 16.1
2. Displacement wave and pressure wave
Ex. 16.2
Worked out examples 1, 2

Day 2

3. Speed of a sound wave in a material medium
4. Speed of sound in a gas
5. Effect of pressure, temperature and humidity on the speed of sound in air

Day 3
6. Intensity of sound waves
7. Appearance of sound to human ear
WOE 3 to 5

Day 4
8. Interference of sound waves
9. Standing longitudinal waves and vibrations of air columns

Day 5
10. Determination of speed of sound in air
11. Beats

Day 6
12. Diffraction
13 Doppler effect
14. Sonic booms

Day 7
15. Musical scale
16. Accoustics of buildings

Day 8
WOE 6 to 15

Day 9
WOE 16 to 23

Day 10
Exercises 1 to 10

Day 11
Exercises 11 to 16

Day 12
Exercises 17 to 22

Day 13
Exercises 23 to 28

Day 14
Exercises 29 to 34

Day 15
Exercises 35 to 40

Day 16
Exercises 41 to 46

Day 17
Exercises 47 to 52

Day 18
Exercises 53 to 58

Day 19
Exercises 59 to 64

Day 20
Exercises 65 to 72

special task 73 to 89
Objective I and II
Questions for short answer

-------------

concepts covered

16.11. Beats

The phenomenon of periodic variation of intensity of sound when two sound waves of slighlty different frequencies interfere, is called beats.

16.12
Bending of waves from an obstacle or an opening is called diffraction.

Diffraction effects are appreciable when the dimensions of openings or the obstacles are comparable or smaller than the wave length of the wave.

16.13 Doppler effect
If the source of sound or the observed or both, move with respect to the medium, the frequency observed may be different from the frequency of the source. This apparent change in frequency of the wave due to motion of the source or the observeer is called Doppler effect.

-----------
Audiovisual lecture

Lesson 45: Sound Waves and Doppler Shift
www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_2/lesson45/Container.html













--------------------
JEE Question 2007 Paper II

In the experiment to determine the speed of sound using a resonance column,

(A) prongs of the tuning fork are kept in a vertical plane
(B) prongs of the tuning fork are kept in a horizontal plane
(C) in one of the two resonances observed, the length of the resonating air column is close to the wavelength of sound in air
(D) in one of the two resonance observed, the length of the resonating air column is close to half of the wavelength of sound in air

Correct Choice: A
---------------------

JEE Question 2007 Paper II

Two trains A and B are moving with speeds 20 m/s and 30 m/s respectively in the same direction on the same straight track, with B ahead of A. The engines are at the front ends. The engine of train A blows a long whistle.

Assume that the sound of the whistle is composed of components varying in frequency from f1 = 800 Hz to f2 = 1120 Hz. The spread in the frequency (highest frequency - lowest frequency) is thus 320 Hz. The speed of sound in still air is 340 m/s.

1. The speed of sound of the whistle is
(A) 340 m/s for passengers in A and 310 m/s for passengers in B
(B) 360 m/s for passengers in A and 310 m/s for passengers in B
(C) 310 m/s for passengers in A and 360 m/s for passengers in B
(D) 340 m/s for passengers in both the trains

Solution: D

Speed of sound is not affected by motion of source or observer. It depends only on the medium and its state of motion w.r.t. the reference frame used.

2. The spread of frequency as observed by the passengers in train B is
(A) 310 Hz
(B) 330 Hz
(C) 350 Hz
(D) 290 Hz

Solution: A

f' = f-0(340-30)/(340-20) = f-0*31/32

∆f' = 31/32∆f-0 = (31/32)*320 = 310 Hz
-----------------------

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 19 OPTICAL INSTRUMENTS

JEE Syllabus

Combinations of mirrors and thin lenses; Magnification.

The syllabus given in JEE syllabus, combinations of mirrors and thin lenses and magnication indicates that this chapter is to be studied. Because in these optical instruments various mirrors and lenses are used to obtain magnification.

1. The eye
2. The apparent size
3. Simple microscope
4. Compound microscope
5. Telescope
6. Resolving power of a telescope and microscope
7. Defects of vision



Study plan

Day 1

19.1. The eye
2. The apparent size
3. Simple microscope

Day 2

19.4. Compound microscope

Worked out examples 1, 2,3

Day 3
19.5. Telescope

Worked out examples 4,5,

Day 4

19.6. Resolving power of a telescope and microscope
7. Defects of vision

Worked out examples: 6 to 10.

Day 5

Questions for short answer 1 to 6

Exercises 1 to 4

Day 6

Questions for short answer 7 to 12

Exercises 5 to 8

Day 7

Objective I 1 to 11

Exercises 9 to 12

Day 8

Objective II 1 to 5
Exercises 13 to 16

Day 9

Exercises 17 - 20

Day 10
Exercises 21 to 24

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 20 DISPERSION AND SPECTRA

Deviation and dispersion of light by a prism;

Sections in the chapter

1. Dispersion
2. Dispersive power
3. Dispersion without average deviation and average deviation without dispersion
4. Spectrum
5. Kinds of spectra
6. Ultraviolet and infrared spectrum
7. Spectrometer
8. Rainbow

Study Plan


Day 1

20.1. Dispersion
2. Dispersive power
3. Dispersion without average deviation and average deviation without dispersion

Day 2
20.4. Spectrum
5. Kinds of spectra
6. Ultraviolet and infrared spectrum
Worked out examples 1 to 3


Day 3

20.7. Spectrometer
8. Rainbow

Day 4
Exercises 1 to 11

Day 5
Objective I and II

Day 6
Questions for short answer
Concept review

Day 7
Formula review

Day 8,9
Additional test paper problems

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 21 SPEED OF LIGHT

No JEE topics

Sections

1. Historical introduction
2. Fizeau method
3. Foucault method
4. Michelson method

Study Plan

Day 1

1. Historical introduction
2. Fizeau method
3. Foucault method
4. Michelson method

Day 2
Exercises 1 to 3
Objective I
Objective II
Questions for Short answer

Day 3
Concept revision
Formula revision

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 22 PHOTOMETRY

No JEE topics

Sections

1 Total radiant flux
2. Luminosity of radiant flux
3. Luminous flux: relative luminosity
4. Luminous efficiency
5. Luminous intensity or illuminating power
6. Iluminance
7. Inverse square law
8. Lambert's cosine law
9. Photometers

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 23 HEAT AND TEMPERATURE

JEE topics

Ideal gas laws 24.7;
Thermal expansion of solids, liquids and gases 23.10;


--------------------
Sections in the chapter

23.1 Hot and Cold bodies
23.2 Zeroth law of thermodynamics
23.3 Defining scale of temperature: Mercury and resistance thermometers
23.4 Constant volume gas thermometer
23.5 Ideal gas temperature scale
23.6 Celsius temperature scale
23.7 Ideal gas equation
23.8 callender's compensated constant pressure thermometer
23.9 Adiabatic and diathermic walls
23.10 Thermal expansion



----------

Study Plan

Day 1
23.1 Hot and Cold bodies
23.2 Zeroth law of thermodynamics
23.3 Defining scale of temperature: Mercury and resistance thermometers

day 2
23.4 Constant volume gas thermometer
23.5 Ideal gas temperature scale
23.6 Celsius temperature scale
23.7 Ideal gas equation

Day 3
23.8 callender's compensated constant pressure thermometer
23.9 Adiabatic and diathermic walls
23.10 Thermal expansion

Day 4
Worked out examples 1 to 10
Day 5
WOE 11 to 17

Day 6
Exercises 1 to 10

Day 7
Exercises 11 to 20

Day 8
Exercises 21 to 30

Day 9

Exercises 31 to 34
Objective I

Day 10
Exercises
Objective II
questions for short answer 1 to 13

Revision Period

Day 11
Concept Review

Day 12
Formula Review

_____________


In this chapter, heat is defined, zeroth law of thermodynamics is given, and temparature measurement with mercury thermomters, resistance thermometer, and constant volume gas thermometer are discussed.

* The energy that is tranferred from one body to the other, without any mechanical work involved, is called heat.

* Two bodies are said to be in thermal equilibrium if no transfer of heat takes place when they are placed in contact.

* Zeroth law of thermodynamics: If two bodies A and B are in thermal equilibiurm and A and C are also in thermal equilibrium then B and C are also in thermal equilibrium.

* zeroth law allows us to introduce the concept of temperature to measure the hotness or coldness of a body.

*All bodies in thermal equilibrium are assigned equal temperature.

* To measure temperature, we can choose a substance and look for a measurable property of the substance which monotonically changes with temperature.

* Length of mercury in long capillary, resistance of a wire, pressure of gas when volume is kept constant are properties which can be used for temperature measurement.

IIT JEE Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 24 KINETIC THEORY OF GASES

Sections in the Chapter

1. Introduction
2. Assumptions of kinetic theory of gases
3. Calculation of pressure of an ideal gas
4. RMS Speed
5. Kinetic interpretation of temperature
6. Deductions from kinetic theory
7. Ideal gas equation
8. Maxwell's speed distribution law
9. Thermodynamic state
10. Brownian motion
11. Vapour
12. Evaporation
13. Saturated and unsaturated vapour: Vapour pressure
14. Boiling
15. Dew point
16. Humidity
17. Determination of relative humidity
18. Phase diagrams: Triple point
19. Dew and fog










-----------
This chapter contains the assumptions for developing kinetic theory of gases, derivation of an expression for pressure exerted by gas on a container, developing a concept of average of the speeds of the molecules, root-mean-square (rms) speed of molecules, derivation of translational kinetic energy of a gas, deriving the functional relation between Temperature of a gas and its rms speed of molecules, and using the kinetic theory to prove Boyle’s law, Charles’ law, Charles’ law of Pressure, Avogadro’s law, Graham’s law of diffusion, and Dalton’s law of partial pressures. The other concepts discussed are Boltzmann constant, Universal gas constant, Maxwell’s speed distribution law, description of thermodynamic state, equation of state, Brownian motion, vapour, evaporation, saturated and unsaturated vapour pressure, dew point, humidity, phase diagrams, dew and fog.

Key Points

Any sample of gas is made of molecules.

Assumptions of kinetic theory of gases :
• All gases are made up of molecules moving in al directions
• The size of the molecule is much smaller than the average separation between the molecules
• The molecules exert no force on each other or the walls of the container except during collisions
• All collisions between two molecules or the walls of the container are perfectly elastic. also the time spent during a collision is negligibly small
• The molecules obey newtons laws of motion.
• When a gas is left for a sufficient time it comes to a steady state, the density and the distribution of molecules with different velocities are independent of position ,direction ,and time. This assumption may be justified if the number of molecules is very large.



The molecular size is roughly 100 times smaller than the average separation between the molecules at 0.1atm and the room temperature

 According to the kinetic theory the internal energy of the ideal gas is the same as the total translational kinetic energy of its molecules .
 vtr is the rms speed of the molecules at 273.16k and hence is a constant for the given gas .
 The absolute temperature of the given gas is proportional to the square of the rms speed of its molecules
 The absolute temperature of the given sample of the gas is proportional to the total translational kinetic energy of its molecules .
 We find that for a different kinds of gases, it is not the rms speed but the average kinetic energy of individual molecules that has a fixed value at a given temperature. The heavier molecules move with a smaller rms speed and the lighter molecules move with larger speed
 Grahams law of diffusion: when two gases at same pressure and temperature are allowed to diffuse into each other,the rate of diffusion of each gas is inversely proportional to the square of the root of the density of the gas. This is known as grahams law of diffusion.
 Dalton’s law of partial pressure: Daltons law of partial pressure says that the pressure exerted by a mixture of several gases equals the sum of the pressure exerted by each gas occupying the same volume as that of the mixture.
 The boltzmann constant: the universal constant k is known as the boltzmann constant and its value is k=1.38*10 ^-23 J/K
 The universal gas constant : R=N(a)k [n(a) =avagadros number] is another universal constant known as the universal gas constant its value is r=8.314J/mol-K.
 The average speed v-bar somewhat smaller then the rms speed.
 Maxwell derived an equation giving the distribution of the molecules in different speeds.
 The speed v (p) at which dn/dv is maximum is called the most probable speed.
 A thermodynamic state of a given sample of an ideal gas is completely described if its pressure and its volume are given
 The equation relating pressure, volume and temperature of a given sample of gaseous substance is called the equation of state for that gaseous substance. For ideal gas it is pV = nRT. For a real gas, van der Waals derived the following equation: [p+(a/V^2)][V-b] = nRT.
 In liquids also, molecules are in constant random motion. Such a phenomenon and motion is called Brownian motion. To observe brownian motion using normal microscope, we need to have light suspended particles in liquids.
 If the temperature is sufficiently high, no amount of pressure can liquify the gas. The temperature above which this behaviour occurs is called the critical temperature of the substance.
 A gas below its critical temperature is called vapour.
 For water critical temperature is 374.1 degrees Celsius.
 Evaporation is a process in which molecules escape slowly from the surface of a liquid due to their random motion.
 The temperature at which the saturation vapour pressure is equal to the present vapour pressure is called the dew point.
 Dew point is measured using Reganault’s hygrometer.
 Triple points is the point at which all three phases of a substance exist in equilibrium.
 Water vapour condensing on flowers, grass is termed dew.
 Water vapour condensing on dust particles in air is forms thick mist called fog.

-----------------------------------
Audio visual lecture

Ideal gases
www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson28/Container.html
----------------------------------
JEE questions from this chapter:

there is question from this chapter in JEE 2007 in paper II

1.
Statement-1
The total translational kinetic energy of all the molecules of an ideal gas is 1.5 times of the product of its pressure and its volume.
because
Statement-2
the molecules of a gas collide with each other and the velocities of molecules change due to the collision.

(A) Statement-1 is true and Statement-2 is true and Statement-2 is a correct explation for Statement-1.
(B) Statement-1 is true and Statement-2 is true and Statement-2 is a not correct explation for Statement-1.
(C) Statement-1 is true and Statement-2 is false.
(D) Statement-1 is false and Statement-2 is true

Correct choice: B

S2 is not a sufficient condition for S1 to be true. The reason being that the collision between molecules and that with the “walls” should be elastic for S1 to be correct.
------------------------

IIT JEE Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 25 CALORIMETRY

Ssections in the chapter

1. Heat as a form of energy
2. Units of heat
3. principles of calorimetry
4. Specific heat capacity and molar heat capacity
5. determination of specific heat capacity in a laboratory
6. Specific latent heat of fusion and vaporization
7. Measurement of specific latent heat of fusion of ice
8. Measurement of specific latent heat of vaporization of water
9. Mechanical equivalent of heat
---------------------
Study Guide

Day 1
1. Heat as a form of energy
2. Units of heat
3. principles of calorimetry
4. Specific heat capacity and molar heat capacity

Day 2

5. determination of specific heat capacity in a laboratory
6. Specific latent heat of fusion and vaporization
7. Measurement of specific latent heat of fusion of ice

Day 3
Worked out examples: 1 to 4
Exercises 1 to 6

Day 4
8. Measurement of specific latent heat of vaporization of water
9. Mechanical equivalent of heat

Day 5
WOE 5, 6
Exercises 7 to 15


Day 6
Exercises 16 to 18
Concept revision

Day 7
Formula revision

Day 8 to 10
Test paper questions around 30






-----------
This chapter covers the concept of heat as a form of energy, units of heat, principle of calorimetry, formula of the amount of heat absorbed for a given change in temperature, specific heat capacity and molar heat capacity of a substance, determination of specific heat capacity in laboratory, concepts of latent heat of fusion and vaporization, measurement of specific latent heat of fusion of ice and of vaporization of water, and mechanical equivalent of heat (Searle's Cone Method).

* the energy being transferred between two bodies or between adjacent parts of a body as a result of temperature difference is called heat.

* Heat is a form of enery. It is energy in transit whenever temperature differences exist. Once it is tranferred it becomes the internal energy of the receiving body.

* The amount of heat needed to increase the temperature of 1 g of water from 14.5 degrees Centigrade to 15.5 degrees Centigrade at a pressure of 1 atm is called 1 calorie.

*The calorie is now defined in terms of joule as 1 cal = 4.186 joule.

*Principle of Calorimetry: The total heat given by the hot objects equals th total heat received by the cold objects.

* Heat supplied to the body Q = ms *(change in temperature) where m = mass of the body, s = specific heat capacity of the substance.

* Units of s = Joules per Kg K or Joules per Kg-degrees Centigrade

* If the amount of substance is expressed in the number of moles
Q = nC *(change in temperature) where n is the number of moles in the sample and the constant C is called molar heat capacity.

* the quantity ms is called the heat capacity of the body. Its unit is J/K.

*The mass of water having the same heat capacity as a given body is called the water equivalent of the body.

------------------
Audiovisual lectures

Lesson 25: Mechanical Equivalent of Heat
www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson25/Container.html

Lesson 26: Specific and Latent Heat
www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson26/Container.html



---------------
JEE examination questions

2007 examination: No questions were asked from this chapter.

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 26 LAWS OF THERMODYNAMICS

JEE syllabus :
Equivalence of heat and work;

First law of thermodynamics and its applications (only for ideal gases) 26.1;
-------

Chapter sections

26.1 The first law of thermodynamics
26.2 Work done by a gas
26.3 Heat engines
26.4 The second law of thermodynamics
26.5 Reversible and irrerversible processes
26.6 entropy
27.7 Carnot engine
---------
Study plan

Day 1
26.1 The first law of thermodynamics
26.2 Work done by a gas

Day 2
26.3 Heat engines

Day 3
26.4 The second law of thermodynamics
26.5 Reversible and irrerversible processes

Day 4
26.6 entropy
27.7 Carnot engine

Day 5
Worked out examples 1 to 11

Day 6
Exercises 1 to 10

day 7
Exercises 11 to 20

Day 8
Exercises 21 to 22
Objective I

Day 9
Objective II
Questions for short answer 1 to 8

Day 10
Questions for short answer 9 to 15

Revision
Day 11
Concept review

Day 12
Formula revision

Days 13 to 20
Problems from test paper books



----------
Concepts covered

26.1 We already studied that heat is a form of energy. A system can be given energy either by supplying heat to it or by doing mechanical work on it.

Suppose in a process, an amount of ΔQ of heat is given to the gas and an amount ΔW of work is done by it.

Total energy of the gas must increase by ΔQ - ΔW. If the container along with the gas does not move (you can say that there is no systematic movement) this net energy must go into the system in the form of its internal energy.

If we denote the change in internal energy by ΔU, we can write

ΔU = ΔQ - ΔW or

ΔQ = ΔU + ΔW

The above equation is a mathematical statement of the first law of thermodynamics. The equation represents a statement of conservation of energy and is applicable to any system, however complicated.

The first law may be taken as a statement that there exists an internal energy function U that has a fixed value in a given state. Remember that internal energy is a state function.

Notation for ΔQ and ΔW

If work is done by the system, ΔW is positive. If work is done on the system ΔW is negative.

When heat is given to the system ΔQ is positive. If heat is given by the system to the surroundings ΔQ is negative.

Internal energy increases when heat is given to the system and work is done on the system.

26.2 Work done by a gas

In a cylindrical piston, if the gas expands by a small distance Δx, change in volume is ΔV which is equal to AΔx, where A is cross sectional area of cylinder or piston. As force is equal to pA work done is equal to

ΔW = p*A*Δx = p*ΔV = pΔV

Work done in expansion of from initial volume of V1 to V2 can be found by integrating pΔV and finding its definite integral value between V1 to V2.

ΔW =∫pΔV

This formual even though derived with cylindrical shape, is applicable to any shape.

Expressions for work done in various specified processes

Work done in an Isothermal process:

In an isothermal process Temperature is constant. Hence pV is constant.
For an ideal gas pV = nRT, therefore p = nRT/V

W is given by the expression nRTln[V2/V1]

Work done in an Isobaric Process

IN this process pressure is constant.
Hence W = p(V2-V1)

Work done in an Isocharic Process

As there is no change in volume of gas in this process, work done is zero.

26.5 Reversible and irrereversible processes

If the gas in thermal equilibrium all the parts of gas will be at the same temperature and the state of the gas can described by specifying its pressure, volume and temperature. If we put the container of gas on a hot stove, various parts of the gas will be at different temperatures and we cannot specify a unique temperature for the gas. The gas in not in thermodynamic equilibrium in this case.

If the process is performed in such a way that at any instant during the process the system is very nearly in thermodynamic equilibrium, the process is called quasi-static. Thus, a quasi static process is an idealized process in which all changes take place infinitely slowly. Such a process may be assumed to be reversible.

But a process can be reversible only if it satisfies two conditions. The process must be quasistatic and it should be nondissipative. This means, friction, viscosity etc. should be completely absent.

Reversible cycle: If all parts of cyclic process are reversible, it is called a reversible process.

-------------
Audiovisual lecture

Laws of thermodynamics
www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson29/Container.html

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 27 SPECIFIC HEAT CAPACITIES OF GASES

JEE syllabus

Specific heats (Cv and Cp for monoatomic and diatomic gases)27.1,27.2,27.3,27.4,
Isothermal and adiabatic processes 27.5 27.6, 27.7

27.1 Two kinds of specific heat capacities
27.2 Relation between Cp and Cv for an ideal gas
27.3 Determination of Cp of a Gas
27.4 Determination of Cv of a Gas
27.5 Isothermal and adiabatic processes
27.6 Relations between p,v, t in a reversible adiabatic process
27.7 Work done in a adiabatic process
27.8 Equipartition of energy

---------
Study Plan

27.1 Two kinds of specific heat capacities
27.2 Relation between Cp and Cv for an ideal gas
27.3 Determination of Cp of a Gas
27.4 Determination of Cv of a Gas
27.5 Isothermal and adiabatic processes
27.6 Relations between p,v, t in a reversible adiabatic process
27.7 Work done in a adiabatic process
27.8 Equipartition of energy

-------------------

Concepts covered
Day 1
27.1 Two kinds of specific heat capacities
27.2 Relation between Cp and Cv for an ideal gas

Day 2
27.3 Determination of Cp of a Gas
27.4 Determination of Cv of a Gas

Day 3
Worked out examples 1 to 5

Day 4
27.5 Isothermal and adiabatic processes
27.6 Relations between p,v, t in a reversible adiabatic process

Day 5
27.7 Work done in a adiabatic process
27.8 Equipartition of energy

Day 6
WOE 6 to 12

Day 7
Exercises 1 to 10

Day 8
Exercises 11 to 20

Day 9
exercises 21 to 30

Day 10
Exercises 31 to 35
Objective objective I

Day 11
Obejctive II

Day 12
Questions for short answer

Day 13
Concept Review

Day 14
Formula Revision

Days 15 to 20
Additional problems from test paper books



----------------

27.1
We already know that specific heat capacity of a substance is defined as the heat supplied per unit mass of the substance per unit rise in the temperature.

In terms of symbols if an amount of ΔQ of heat is given to a mass of n of the substance and its temperature rises by ΔT, the specific heat capacity s is given by the equation

s = ΔQ/mΔT .......(27.1)

This definition is applicable to solids, liquids and gases.

Specific heat capacity of a gas depends on the process involved. Two specific processes are important and specific heat capacities are defined specifically for these processes.

Constant volume process and constant pressure process

When the volume of a gas of mass m is kept constant and heat is given it, the specific heat capacity calculated is called the specific heat capacity at constant volume and is denoted by symbol sv.

When the pressure of a gas of mass m is kept constant and heat is given it, the specific heat capacity calculated is called the specific heat capacity at constant pressure and is denoted by symbol sp.

The molar heat capacities of a gas are defined as the heat given per mole of the gas per unit rise in the temperature.

The molar heat capacity at constant volume is denoted by symbol Cv.

Cv. = ΔQ/nΔT .......(27.4)heat is given at constant volume of the gas
Where n = number of moles gas

The molar specific heat capacity at constant pressure is denoted by symbol Cp.

Cp. = ΔQ/nΔT .......(27.5) heat is given at constant pressure.

Note that quite often, the term specific heat capacity or specific heat is used for molar heat capacity also. To find out the implied meaning you have to note the units given.

The unitof specific heat capacity is J/Kg-K where as that of molar heat capacity is J/mol-K.

27.2

Study guide H C Verma JEE Physics Ch. 28. HEAT TRANSFER

JEE syllabus

Blackbody radiation 28.7:
absorptive and emissive powers;
Kirchhoff’s law 28.8;
Wien’s displacement law,
Stefan’s law 28.10.




------------------
sections in the book

28.1 Thermal conduction
28.2 Series and parallel connection of rods
28.3 Measurment of thermal conductivity of a solid
28.4 Convection
28.5 Radiation
28.6 Prevost theory of exchange
28.7 Blackbody radiation
28.8 Kirchhoff’s law
28.9 Nature of thermal radiation
28.10 Stefan-Boltzmann Law
28.11 Newton's law of cooling
28.12 Detection and Measurement of Radiation

-----------------
Study Plan

Day 1
28.1 Thermal conduction
28.2 Series and parallel connection of rods
28.3 Measurment of thermal conductivity of a solid

Day 2
Worked out examples 1 to 10

Day 3
28.4 Convection
28.5 Radiation

Day 4
WOE 11 to 15
Exercises 1 to 5

Day 5
28.6 Prevost theory of exchange
28.7 Blackbody radiation
28.8 Kirchhoff’s law

Day 6
28.9 Nature of thermal radiation
28.10 Stefan-Boltzmann Law
WOE 16,17

Day 7
28.11 Newton's law of cooling
28.12 Detection and Measurement of Radiation
WOE 18 to 20
Exercises 6 to 10

Day 8
Exercises 11 to 20

Day 9

Exercises 21 to 30

Day 10
Exercises 31 to 40

Day 11
Exercises 41 to 45


Day 12
Exercises 46 to 50


Day 13
Exercises 51 to 55


Day 14
Objective I


Day 15
Objectie II


Day 16
questions for short answer 1 to 11


Day 17
Concept review


Day 18
Formula review

Day 19,20
Additional questions from test paper guides

------------------
Audiovisual lecture

Lesson 27: Heat Transfer and Thermal Expansion
www.curriki.org/nroc/Introductory_Physics_1/lesson27/Container.html